It's gonna be an interesting few years

After doing a lot of talking with my new boss and others members of the service, I’ve come to the conclusion that my first year or two working for this service might be interesting.

First, what I really don’t like. This agency was an all-volunteer agency until about a year ago, and it shows. Now, I’m not trying to put down volunteers, as sometimes they are very professional and great to work with. But we all know some volunteer agencies who are only there because it looks cool and don’t want to do anything more than bare minimum. Or they’re there because it’s a family thing.

This service seems to be a little bit of both. Only 3 medics on the staffing list, mostly EMT-Is and EMT-Bs. A lot of them related in one way or another, and think that it will only help that they are. I’m ok with that, though, since they are willing to hire from out of the area and, hey, they’re giving me a job :D.

What I can’t stand though, is how little they care about education. They are excited to get the newest toys and gadgets, but don’t really like to look at the newest research to see why or why not they should be doing something. Tradition plays a very big role in how they think. The old “We’ve always done it this way”. Luckily they have a medical director who doesn’t like that and wants to keep pushing the protocols to be more progressive.

But things still fall through the cracks and are done just like always. One of them is working a code on scene. I’ve always been taught that you only transport a working code once you get ROSC. They are a big fan of stopping CPR to get the patient into the bus, then running hell-bent towards the nearest hospital with only one provider in the back working the code, in a moving rig, running L/S, and getting thrown around. I’m not a fan of that. Hopefully it’s one thing I can help change their mind on. But we’ll see.

I’ve talked to the chief about going back to school, since I want to finish up and get my medic soon. He’s all for it, but the minute I said I wanted to go for the AAS as a minimum, his eyes kinda glazed over. HE doesn’t understand why anyone would think that a medic isn’t quite educated enough. I love the fact that TX recognizes the extra education and issues a license, not a cert in this case, of Paramedic.

I’ve talked to a couple of the people at teh station about the EMS 2.0 movement and things like #CoEMS (I wore my EMS 2.0 pin on my dress shirt for my ‘interview’, so it was kinda obvious), and one of the on duty crew said she was all in favor of it (she was a part timer who also works as a flight medic). The other just kinda shrugged and said she had her basic, which was more than enough education for her. Not quite what I was hoping to hear. But the chief said he’s ok with me continuing to blog, as well as being active in the EMS social media aspect, which is what I wanted.

Now the service isn’t all bad. Like I said earlier, they have a very progressive medical director. I was told by the chief that if I came up with any research, that the medical director’s door was always open to improvements in the system. Also if there were any new toys that he was more than ok with me learning how to write grants to try and get money for them, pending MD approval. One of those devices is the Zoll Autopulse or the Physio equivalent. I figure if they want to risk everyone by running codes in a moving bus, I’ll see if I can get a device to make it safer and easier for all involved.

Their medical director wants them to get serious about hiring good ALS providers, and according to the chief, the MD would eventually like to see the system move to an all ALS approach. I’m more than ok with that, since it sounds like they want to try to model if after ATcEMS, which seems to be a great system. I have an official interview with the medical director already requested so I can talk to him and get a feel for how he like his ALS providers to function and talk to him about a few questions I have over just how long a leash he gives to EMT-Intermediates in his system, so hopefully I can get a good rapport with him started.

The other good news about the area… I went to the nearest big city on Wednesday morning to talk to their community college’s medic coordinator. He seemed to be a great guy, and seemed interested in me entering their program. They do offer the EMT-P AAS, which I want to take advantage of. He did tell me, though, that I can start their certificate program as early as January if I get paperwork in in time, and then finish the gen-ed courses for the AAS after I get my #discopatch. Not a bad idea. The downside is a 75 mile commute one way for classes. And clinicals. I do, however, get to do half my ride time in my small-town agency. So it is not as bad as it could be. And my new boss said he would be willing to put me on 1 24 and 1 12 a week of first out, and 1 12 every other week as second out (on call), or 2 24s a week and 1 12 of second out every other week, whichever I wanted. He is not a fan of 24s, but he said in my case it might make things easier.

I think I’ll get my medic and try to stay here for another 4 years or so at least once I get it. Then I’m seriously debating trying to transfer to ATcEMS and trying to get on with their system to finish out a career if I decide to stay a medic. but I’m not sure.

Either way, it’s going to be one hell of a ride. Maybe I can make my own little #thunder out there.